Thursday: Block 4 (90 min) 2-3:30pm

COSEBOC 12th Annual Gathering of Leaders
Boys and Young Men of Color: Liberated, Empowered and Educated
Boston Park Plaza Hotel | Boston, MA |  May 29 - 31, 2018

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  1. Dreams Unfold, Nightmares Come True
    Ameen Akbar, Director, YouthBuild Philadelphia Charter School
    How can educators channel the same energy that led the Eagles to win their 1st Super Bowl, to fuel the fire in the students we nurture? To create a highly engaging, emotionally safe, and loving school environment, we first center the students and immerse ourselves in their lives. We allow them to tell us where they come from and where they want to go. The Dreams & Nightmares cultural phenomenon from 2012 has clearly grown to be an anthem for men of color across the world. From a HS dance to an after party for South African Fashion Week to pre-exam motivation at a prep school to the Super Bowl Champion Philadelphia Eagles theme music, the lyrics reveal an inspirational truth to be explored.
      
  2. Developing Driven, Engaging, Resilient, and Responsible Boys and Young Men
    Clyde Cole, President, Partnership for Boys, Inc.
    What are the leadership competencies for boys and young men of color and how can I develop them in students? How can I create environments in my school and classroom where boys and young men of color can be successful? This workshop has two parts. Part One guides participants through activities and strategies they can replicate in schools and classrooms for use with boys and young men of color. Part Two leads participants through a session on Empathy, Conflict Resolution, and Growth Mindset that will give them tools on how to develop these leadership competencies in boys and young men of color
     
  3. Bringing to Life the School Code of Conduct: Juvenile Justice Jeopardy an Interactive Tool for Educating Boys of Color
    James Durodola, Director, Strategies for Youth
    How do we educate boys of color to understand and effectively navigate their school's code of conduct? In this workshop, participants will explore the session’s essential question as we engage in a powerful presentation and interactive activities that focus on how to assist boys and young men of color to understand and navigate their school code of conduct. Participants will be introduced to Strategies for Youth Juvenile Justice Jeopardy game (JJJeopardy). JJJeopardy is an education program cloaked as a game. The objective of the game is to makes the school code of conduct come alive for youth by focusing on what youth are disciplined for failing to comply with, e.g attendance rules, legal school zone and etc.
     
  4. Implicit Bias: How Well-Intentioned Teachers and Administrators Perpetuate, Widen and Deepen the Achievement, Opportunity and Access Gaps
    Paul Forbes, Executive Director, NYC Department of Education (ESI)
    Most people in this country adamantly reject any form of racism, sexism, prejudice and discrimination. However, research shows us that the same people unknowingly reveal recurring patterns of subconscious bias in their thoughts, feelings and actions. This bias is more commonly known as implicit bias. According to the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity, implicit bias refers to the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner. These biases, which encompass both favorable and unfavorable assessments, are activated involuntarily and without an individual’s awareness or intentional control. During this interactive session, participants will examine implicit biases and understand how they manifest in practices, policies and procedures. They will also learn strategies to minimize and reduce the effects of biases.
     
  5. Leveraging Partnerships to Create Restorative School Communities for Our Boys of Color
    Stefani Harvey, Safe and Welcoming Schools specialist, Boston Public Schools (BPS)
    How to leverage partnerships to advocate for restorative communities and implement practices in order to maximize social emotional supports and learning for our boys and young men of color?
    Our goal will be to immerse participants into an interactive experience and dialogue about how to create a restorative school community for boys of color. We hope to address and identify strategies for overcoming the barriers and stigma that prevent schools from fully supporting the social, emotional and academic needs of boys of color. Our workshop will include an activity, a circle process and discussion time for questions answers and reflection.
     
  6. Being the Difference: Diversifying the Teaching Force through NYC Men Teach
    Richard Haynes, Director, NYC Department of Education
    What are current teacher recruitment pathways and how does one get into them? What messaging is used to engage men of color into the teaching profession? How much investment is allocated towards creating an equitable teaching force? The majority of NYC residents are people of color; 41 percent of public school students are Latino; 25 percent are Black; Black and Latino male students bear the burden of negative disparities—from high school dropout rates to interactions with the criminal justice system—Office of the Mayor's Young Men’s Initiative (YMI) designed NYC Men Teach, a data-informed recruitment and retention strategy aimed at improving equity in teacher preparedness, teacher selection, teacher supports, and teacher leadership for men of color. This session will explore the design and implementation of NYC Men Teach.
     
  7. Blended and Braided: The Impact of Integrating SEL into the Curricular Framework
    Zackory Kirk, Director, Atlanta Public Schools
    How can an integration of the tenets of social and emotional learning into curriculum increase student achievement, decrease issues with student behavior, and improve school culture? This interactive learning opportunity will provide a highly engaging learning opportunity ideal for district leaders and administrators as well as community stakeholders and advocates. The process of intentionally integrating the tenets of social and emotional learning into the curricular framework (locally developed standards aligned units of study) will be overviewed using the model employed by the Atlanta Public School System. Participants will learn how SEL integration into a highly effective curricular model can enhance academic achievement and decrease disciplinary infractions for boys of color while also promoting a positive school culture.
     
  8. DIY Coaching: A New Approach to Advancing Equity in Classrooms
    James Likis, Consultant, DIY Coaching
    How can video be used as a self-reflective tool to enable teachers to create more equitable classrooms? Participants will engage in an approximation of the DIY Coaching Model by analyzing classroom video through the lens of equitable, rigorous instruction. We will begin by unpacking the Standards of Mathematical Practice and NGSS Practices that will serve as our frame for analyzing instruction. Next, participants will watch two classroom videos, engage in preparing for a coaching conversation afterwards as if they were the teacher or a peer, and identify next steps to advance equity in instruction. While this session will focus on STEM practices, all are encouraged to attend: the DIY Coaching Model is transferable across content areas!
     
  9. To Board or Not to Board: Exploring the Viability of Establishing an Urban Boarding School for Boys of Color
    Robert Murphy, The Masters Preparatory Academy
    Is creating an urban boarding school a viable strategy for meeting the social, emotional, and academic needs of boys of color? Participants will explore the pro and cons and myriad issues of establishing an urban boarding school for boys of color. After a short introduction from The CEO / Founder and two board members from The Masters Preparatory Academy, a boarding school being developed in Columbus, Ohio and directions on process, participants will be split into two groups. One group would brainstorm the pros of developing the boarding and the other on the cons. Participants will debate, with each side presenting their views and opinions. The session will conclude with a Q & A with the panel of presenters.
     
  10. Believing in Brilliance: The ABC’s of The Brilliant Boys Book Club
    Michael Redmond, Principal: PreK-12 Truesdell Education Campus/DCPS
    How can we support changing the narrative around boys of color engagement with reading such that they are undaunted by any text placed before them and able to capture the nuance of critical thinking in the highest quality of writing? When is reading books joyful? When there is rich discussion about how the book touched your heart. Participate in a workshop fashioned after an urban school featured in the Washington Post focused on an innovative approach to changing the narrative about how boys of color perceive themselves as scholars and how others view them as voracious readers. The Brilliant Boy Book Club, engages and affirms our boys of color, sets the expectation for scholar identity, and provides the space and time to foster community of learners.
     
  11. Hip-Hop(e): Reinvigorating Social and Emotional Learning with Cultural Relevance and Equity
    Roberto Rivera, Award winning artist, educator, and change agent, CASEL
    Current research suggests that 50% of all high school students will end up in a job that doesn’t exist yet. How do we prepare our students to thrive in the 21st century when they are marginalized by society and often living in under-resourced communities? In this breakout Roberto Rivera, will share cutting edge research and case studies that have engaged youth to go from surviving to thriving in school, community, and life. Sharing a framework he calls Hip-Hop(e), he will engage educators and school leaders to understanding how to create the culture and pedagogy in classrooms and schools necessary to access and nurture the social and emotional competence and cultural capital that is already present in their students' lives. This workshop is also designed to engage participants in reflecting on and accessing their own competence, cultural capital, and building hope. Come ready to learn, dialogue, reflect and have fun in this Hip-hop culture inspired workshop guaranteed to ensure empowerment, liberation, and leave you energized and refreshed.
     
  12. Creating Meaningful Connections Through Advisory
    Jamila Sams, Consultant, Go to Ms.Sams Inc.
    How can the structure of advisory be used to create culturally responsive and connected schools that promote a community of learners who are liberated, empowered and educated? Students who do not feel connected to their school community have poorer attendance and drop out more than students who are a part of a supportive school environment. For young men of color, it is paramount that schools establish positive cultures where education is used as a tool for liberation and empowerment. Creating Meaningful Connections Through Advisory provides participants with a framework to develop an advisory program within their school. Advisory is a scheduled period of time where adults create safe spaces to have discussions and activities with students that address personal challenges, academics, social-emotional growth and career-oriented goals.
      
  13. Launching a District Wide Equity Initiative: A Case Study on Challenging the Impact of Institutional Racism on African American Students and Educators
    Allen Smith, Administrator, Denver Public Schools - Culture, Equity and Leadership Team
    How does a school district begin to address the negative impacts of institutional / systemic racism to improve the lived experiences of students and educators of color? Presenters will share the findings of the research related to the persistence of institutional racism, the process of community engagement through the African American Equity Task Force (AAETF), and the structures and tools we have put in place to drive the implementation of the recommendations. Presenters will also share the process for designing change management, accountability for equity, engaging community voice and lessons learned in this work so far. Participants will be actively engaged in personal reflection and group sharing relative their respective challenges of implementing policies and practices that serve the well-being of boys and male educators of color.
     
  14. Showing our True Colors: Edifying Culturally Sustaining Principal Preparation and Leadership Development of Black Male School Principals
    Phillip A. Smith, College/University Staff, Teachers College, Columbia University
    How may we, through a discourse on leadership models grounded in African-centered traditions and philosophies, as well as other non-Western models of leadership enhance our understanding of effective models of race/color-conscious, culturally sustaining approaches to principal preparation and leadership development? In this workshop we explore the relationship between race, racial identity, racism, social justice, and inequalities in education leadership and leadership development. We will focus on culturally sustaining models of mentoring, the role of African-centered approaches to leadership and leadership development, as well as the notion of critical spirituality within the field of education leadership development. This will be a fully interactive, multimodal session and discussion. The facilitator will use short video clips, pictorial flashcards, short presentations, storytelling, group discussions and feedback, and worksheets to stimulate critical thinking and dialogue on a [re]framing of normalized leadership preparation and leadership development.
     
  15. We are C.H.A.M.P.S (Community Healers And Mentors for Personal Success: The Power of Peer Mentorship in Collective Healing for Young Men and Boys of Color
    Kevin Stewart, Consultant, Healing Justice Alliance 
    Can educators and other school personnel harness the resilience in our boys and young men of color to help in their healing? If so, how? We will provide an overview of the Make It Happen program, which provides therapeutic support to young men of color impacted by violence. We will discuss the services we offer in schools and introduce our Make It Happen C.H.A.M.P.S (Community Healers And Mentors for Personal Success). From our own internal qualitative study conducted towards the end of 2012, it noted a lack of informal male mentors or “old heads” for young men in many of these communities. We will discuss the innovative ways our C.H.A.M.P.S peer model is attempting to change the narrative on what socio-emotional support can look like.
     
  16. Breaking the Chains: How a New Boston High School Used the Power of Young Men to Build Brotherhood, Define Culture, and Leave a Legacy
    Samuel Texeira, Teacher: PreK-12, Henderson School; Strong Men Strong Leaders
    How do we create an environment for young men in urban high schools that fosters growth, accountability, brotherhood, excellence, and knowledge of self that is also engaging, incorporates student voice, and that the young men themselves buy into? Armed only with a vision and advice from supporters, thirty young men and a second year teacher at a new high school sought to define and create a school culture, build brotherhood, and change the narrative of men of color. With the school community and families at the table, the social and academic outcomes of our boys have and are changing. Please join Strong Men Strong Leaders as we seek to provide support for others looking to facilitate a young men's group in their school. This workshop will not only include student voice, they will organize and conduct it.
      
  17. Not a Savage, But a Scholar and a Gentlemen
    Ronald Whitaker, College/University, Staff, Cabrini University
    Insights from a Culturally Relevant College and Career Readiness project for Black Males What needs to be changed from a programmatic, pedagogical, and policy perspective to improve the college and career outcomes for Black males? This workshop shares lessons learned from a College and Career Readiness improvement project that is currently being facilitated for Black males at an Urban Northeastern school. The aforementioned is critically important, given the national data that outlines academic and employment gaps for Black males (Schott Report, 2015 & Pew research, 2013). Therefore this presentation aims to provide community and educational leaders a model designed to address the following four main areas in College and Career Readiness: (1) Global Marketplace Skill Development, (2) Leadership Development, (3) Professional Branding and (4) Improved Self-Confidence for Participants.

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