Thursday AM: Block 3 (90 min) 10:15-11:45am

COSEBOC 12th Annual Gathering of Leaders
Boys and Young Men of Color: Liberated, Empowered and Educated
Boston Park Plaza Hotel | Boston, MA |  May 29 - 31, 2018

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  1. Improving the Teachers We Already Have: Feedback as a Tool of School Improvement
    Lionel Allen, Jr., Chief Academic Officer, Urban Prep Academies
    How can school leaders leverage high quality feedback as a tool of teacher development and school improvement? It is imperative that school leaders are intentional about designing systems and structures within their schools that provide for the professional growth and development of their teachers and staff. The key to dramatic and sustained school improvement is adult development. The creation of high quality feedback structures are a potent way to develop adults. In this session, participants will learn how to leverage high quality feedback as a tool of teacher development and school improvement.
     
  2. Math for Agency
    Danielle Alli, Teacher: PreK-12, Boston Public Schools-Office of Opportunity & Achievement Gaps
    How do we introduce students of color to math curriculum that is inclusive rather than exclusive in 8th through 12th grade education? Facilitators look at the problematic nature of many of the materials that we currently present to students, focusing on math curriculum (grades 8th-12th ). Once the “why” behind the work is addressed, we will explore interdisciplinary work between math and historical content that can create more meaningful and empowering programs of study. Attendees will explore materials, initiate dialogue around new topics of study and discuss the challenges of implementing this work. We close with the impact currently observed in classrooms and the intended consequences of continuing to look at the ability of math to tell narratives that represent our students.
     
  3. Better Together: Collaborating Across Sectors to Improve Instruction for 3rd & 4th Grade Boys of Color
    Thabiti Brown, Principal: PreK-12, Codman Academy
    How can a cross-sector approach to supporting 3rd and 4th grade boys in reaching high levels of achievement contribute to the national conversation about educating boys of color? Our session is about collaboration: both our own as principals committed to improving instruction for 3rd-4th grade Black and Latino boys, and in the workshop itself to emphasize the power of collective knowledge and working together. We begin with a presentation on our COSEBOC-centered work, focusing particularly on the opportunities and challenges of cross-sector (charter, district, and Catholic school) collaboration. Participants will then join a small group discussion with one of us on a particular problem of practice (collectively determined). There will be opportunities for individual consultations. Notes from group discussions will be synthesized and shared post workshop.
     
  4. Why Black Male Educators Matter in the Lives of Black Boys
    Vincent Cobb, Sharif El-Mekki & Travis Bristol, The Fellowship: Black Male Educators for Social Justice
    What are key benefits of having more Black male educators in schools? Why are Black male educators important for Black boys and young men? How can schools increase the teacher talent pipeline for more Black male educators? Right now, less than 2% of teachers nationwide are Black men. The Fellowship- Black Male Educators for Social Justice is working with school districts to accomplish their mission to recruit 1,000 Black male educators by 2025. Dr. Travis Bristol and other recent studies show a multitude of factors impacting the retention of Black men in teaching, including: harder working conditions at high-poverty, harder-to-staff schools; social isolation—a lack of support from administrators and peer support. The teacher corps that better reflects society brings more opportunities for educational experiences that counter stereotypes and racism, promote cross-cultural understanding, and helps advance student achievement. Participants will learn about conditions impacting representation in public schools through supported research and voices of other Black male educators. They will learn culturally competent practices for school leaders to attract and retain more diverse educators in schools – specifically, Black male educators.
     
  5. Building and Sustaining Culturally Responsive Environments for Black and Latino Students in NYC School
    Paul Forbes, Executive Director, NYC Department of Education (ESI)
    Culturally Responsive Education has been a buzz word in the educational field the last 20 years. How can we ensure that this approach moves beyond the classroom and becomes the lens that is utilized throughout the school community? Participants will learn how the Office of Equity and Access within the NYC Department of Education, is working with school communities to bring a culturally response lens not only to the classroom but also to discipline, family and community engagement, social-emotional learning, recruitment and onboarding of staff, professional development and critically conscious curriculum. This has led to CREATES – Culturally Responsive Environments Attaining Transformative Equitable Solutions. Learn how this work has evolved and grown through videos, small group discussion and from the the experts...our young people.
     
  6. Healing Minds: Fostering Positive Educational Outcomes for Boys of Color Through a Comprehensive, Culturally-Relevant School Mental Health Program
    Charmain Jackman, Administrator, Charmain Jackman
    How can we shape school policies/practices and build strong school-home-community partnerships that will ensure boys of color have access to comprehensive and culturally-relevant prevention and intervention programming that will address their diverse mental health and wellness needs? Approximately 80% of children with mental health concerns receive no treatment. Therefore, schools play a critical role in supporting the mental health needs of students. In this interactive workshop, participants will explore how a comprehensive school mental health model can support early identification, decrease mental health stigma; increase access to mental health supports; and guide school policies. Through case studies and personal narratives, we will show how culturally responsive school-wide policies/practices (e.g., Social-Emotional Learning (SEL); Restorative circles) and clinical interventions (e.g., solution-focused/trauma-focused cognitive-behavior therapy; Expressive Arts) are essential to empowering youth and fostering positive educational outcomes for boys of color.
     
  7. From the Beginning: The Importance of Educational and Emotional Stability for Little Boys
    Abigail James, Adjunct Professor
    What is the reason that boys are more likely to be identified with developmental learning delays, autism, and conduct disorder and what can schools do to help boys and their families develop strategies to deal with these problems? Males are more likely to be identified with ADHD, learning delays, conduct disorders, and autism. Indications are that the problem may stem from developmental delays in the stress-regulating structures in the male brain precipitating behavioral and emotional problems. This delay has implications for early childcare and schooling as boys in elementary school are as much as two years behind girls in developing social skills. With group projects and social communication increasing in importance, this means that boys are falling behind. This session will examine these new findings and discuss strategies and approaches to help the boys in our schools.
     
  8. Wakonda! Bringing Coding to Our Boys and Young Men of Color!
    Benadette Manning, Teacher: PreK-12, Boston Public Schools
    How will coding play a pivotal role in the roles of our boys and young men of color now and 30 years from now? This workshop is for participants who want expose boys to the latest trends in technology such as basic programming, making a website, programming robots, Scratch, or designing Lego robots but did not know where or how to start. No coding experience needed. Most participants are new at technology; however, participants who are more experienced are welcome too.
     
  9. Identifying Culturally Responsive Educators in Urban Districts
    Cory McCarthy, Administrator, New Mission High School (Boston Public Schools)
    How to identify educators that provide a strong cultural atmosphere for our students to grow into their identities, equip students with tools to dismantle oppression in daily interactions and how race plays a role in impacting students and their trajectories? This session will use culturally responsive pedagogy to identify potential educators who are equipped with the acumen, empathy and tools necessary to cultivate the talents of Black and brown scholars. My session will link the STP pipeline directly to instruction and help school leaders identify applicants who not only look like our scholars but who have the capacity to work with them to change their trajectories.
     
  10. Required Reading Reconsidered
    Afrika Afeni Mills, Instructional Coach, BetterLesson
    How can educators ensure that the literature explored in reading classes is inclusive and considerate of the interests and experiences of students of color in addition to being inclusive of the literature that is typically part of the literary canon? Educators who attend this session will examine the voids that may exist in their school’s required literary canons. Session facilitators will engage participants in discussion while also providing resources and practical solutions for creating more inclusive and richer literary experiences for students.
     
  11. A Tale of Two Schools: Finding “Missing” Black Men in Advanced Placement Courses and Using the Two Schools Framework as a Means to Liberate, Empower, and Educate
    Kayla Morrow, Executive Director, AP for All, NYC Department of Education
    Why are so many Black male students “missing” from Advanced Placement courses, why should we care about this issue, and what can we do to address this inequitable reality? There is a significant gap in access to Advanced Placement courses nationwide. The New York City Department of Education has started a citywide initiative, AP for All, to increase access to, participation in, and performance in AP courses. Through this work, two school support models have emerged: (1) for schools with established AP programs; and (2) for schools just starting to offer AP courses. Participants in this workshop will engage in problem-solving scenarios fashioned under both models and will learn how to find, to support, and to advocate on behalf of “missing” black male students in AP courses.
     
  12. Sankofa Sojourn: Process and Impacts of HS Study Abroad to Ghana
    Ani Mwalimu, Executive Director, Pan-African Connections
    How do we organize culturally relevant international experiential learning opportunity for young men of African descent that build agency and positively impact academic outcomes? Using the framework of Consciousness, Capacity, and Community, the non-profit Pan-African Connections, has built an 18 month youth leadership development model that culminates in a two week Sankofa study abroad program to Ghana. Participants begin with a theoretical framework and then learn the step by step process and impacts of constructing such a program. Practitioners will create their own trip outline and leave with strategies, best practices, and the confidence to launch their trip through their own educational institutions.
     
  13. Intergenerational Mentorship: Leading for the Win-Win
    Hanif Omar, New York City Department of Education District 16 Office of the Superintendent
    How do we facilitate understandings that center the necessity for inter-generational male mentorship for the development of authentic and sustainable professional learning communities for male achievement? This interactive workshop will include a game-show style assessment of common understandings (or misunderstandings) of the necessity of mentorship for boys and young men of color. Based on research and experience, this workshop will explore two approaches to mentoring: Strength-Based and Critical Mentoring as ways to meet the needs of young men of color in schools and communities. The workshop will honor participants varying levels of experience and understanding relative to inter-generational mentorship. Participants will collaborate to exchange ideas and begin to develop a draft of a how a strength-based or critical mentorship model could work in their school community.
     
  14. Building the Legacy: College Completion Strategies for Nation-building
    Brian Peterson, Director, Makuu: The Black Cultural Center
    How can we foster culturally relevant missions and programs for our young men to maintain the motivation, focus, and support network to complete college? I will do a student version of this session during the Young Men's Passage. This follow-up talk with help practitioners understand HOW to do this work, what the challenges are, and create a space to share experiences. I will connect the work we do at Penn and in the community, and also map out some of the many opportunities through BMEC / The Fellowship, research centers such as Howard Stevenson's REC (Racial Empowerment Collaborative) and Shaun Harper's Race and Equity Center, and more.
     
  15. The Paradox of Liberation, Empowerment, & Education: Challenging Biases, Privilege, & Power in Ourselves and Our Institution
    Efrain Ramirez, LAYC Career Academy
    How do biases, privileges, and the power of the individual and of the institution affect our relationships with youth and the work of executing the liberation, empowerment, and education of our youth? As educators, counselors, organizers, etc. we have taken the task of liberating, empowering, & educating the young people we work with. We must overcome obstacles in executing these 3 values. Sometimes these are systemic, sometimes it is our own agency, yet both are rooted in biases, privileges, & power. Through a series of different hands-on activities, participants will be challenged to explore biases, privileges, and power they and their institution have, while examining how it affects their work and relationships with young people. Before we execute these 3 values, we must be aware of what we bring to the table.
     
  16. Considering Developing an Ethnic Studies Program? First Steps, What to Do and Not Do
    Josue Sakata, Curriculum Director/Specialist, Boston Public Schools
    How do we create the pathway for an ethnic studies program in Boston, or any other school district, that meets the definition of what ethnic studies should be? It is important to provide students authentic learning opportunities centered around their and others’ cultural identities and tied to the elements of effective history and social studies instruction. This session focuses on the early efforts to bring a comprehensive ethnic studies program in the Boston Public Schools. Through adult learning activities, we share what the first steps we have taken to begin considering the idea of Ethnic Studies in the Boston Public Schools, and will use protocols to gather ideas on the work going on.
     
  17. Mastering Challenging Conversations: Preparing New Teachers for Racial Equity Talks Concerning Boys and Young Men of Color
    Jalene Tamerat, Director of New Teacher Development, Boston Public Schools
    How do we build the mindsets in new teachers that support racial equity for boys and men of color through effective preparation and coaching practices? The national teacher workforce does not reflect the diversity of students in public schools. In Boston Public Schools, 38% of BPS educators are teachers of color contrasted with a student population that is 85% diverse. Teachers must engage in self-reflection and examination of practice to ensure racial equity in classrooms. Coaching conversations supporting the empowerment of all students, and specifically, boys and young men of color, must be navigated with care. Participants in this workshop will engage with frameworks and tools supporting coaching conversations around racial equity, and take part in various protocols to move from theory to practice.

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