Wednesday: Block 2 (3 hours) 1:30-5pm

COSEBOC 12th Annual Gathering of Leaders
Boys and Young Men of Color: Liberated, Empowered and Educated
Boston Park Plaza Hotel | Boston, MA |  May 29 - 31, 2018

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  1. Trauma and The Student Athlete: Creating a Therapeutic Environment Using Restorative Practices and Circle Process
    Byron Beaman, Jeremiah E. Burke High School
    How do we create a therapeutic environment on athletic teams that help student athletes deal with trauma? In order for student athletes to maximize their potential, we must help them cope with existing obstacles. Participate in a workshop designed to help coaches create a therapeutic environment within their program and support student athletes dealing with trauma.
     
  2. Liberation Education: How New York City Is Working to Empower Young Men of Color as They C.L.I.M.B to the Summit of Their Potential
    Hector Calderon, Curriculum Director/Specialist, NYC DOE's Urban Ambassadors
    How do we nurture the next generation of leaders who will transform themselves and the world around them?NYC Urban Ambassadors is a leadership program for young men of color who are in high school that is sponsored by the Office of Equity and Access/NYC Department of Education. In this youth-led and interactive workshop you will learn about our College readiness, Leadership, Introspection, Mastery Learning and Brotherhood (CLIMB) framework, as well as experience activities that promote the affirmative development of young men of color. Young men from Urban Ambassadors will lead you through strategies that can be used to nurture the intellectual and leadership potential of young men at your schools or community based organizations.
     
  3. Kingmakers of Oakland - Treating the Fish in the Toxic Ecosystem
    Chris Chatmon, Executive Director, OUSD African American Male Achievement (AAMA)
    How do we engage, encourage and empower African American male students (inoculate) while we treat structural racism and institutional oppression (Toxic Ecosystem)? OUSD AAMA SLC Team will lead an interactive workshop lead based on AAMA SLC students. Participate in a workshop that shares the many lessons learned about how a school district improves the educational outcomes of AAM students from AAM students. Workshop participants will learn about: • dsrupt patterns of institutional racism; Change the Narrative about Black boys in Oakland; school-day academic mentoring course via the Manhood Development Program (grades 4-10); Man Up! Conferences; parent engagement; collaboration and partnership in support of African American male achievement; professional development
     
  4. Empowering Youth Through Civic Engagement: Curriculum as a Tool for Agency and Equality
    Eliza Fabillar, Education Development Center, Inc.
    How can we empower youth to think critically about and take action to shape the legal and civic landscape at local, state, regional, and national levels? “Empowerment” requires understanding what power means, who has it, and how it can be used to make the civic landscape more equitable and just. Session participants will explore what “justice” means, and reimagine the classroom as a place where the “fourth branch” of government - the people – can be educated and energized to become agents of change in support of democratic ideals. Participants take a deep dive into sample classroom and community experiences from EDC’s Law and Justice curriculum that help students understand law, law enforcement, and advocacy, and the role youth can play in each.
      
  5. High Expectations Teaching to Empower Cultural Proficiency
    Jon Saphier, President, Research for Better Teaching
    In addition to Culturally Proficient teaching, what else is crucial for teachers to do to enable black boys to forge past the messages that surround them in American society that they are "less than"? This session will show video clips and enact demonstrations of how teachers handle daily situations of classroom life so as to build the confidence, the agency and the commitment of boys of color to believe in themselves and exert effective effort. That includes teaching them exactly what effective effort is and how to exert it. Participants will leave with specific strategies to use and personal energy to mobilize collective efficacy in their schools for what is truly possible for boys of color.
     
  6. Deepening the Conversation About Race: Engaging and Sustaining Adult and Young Men of Color
    Glenn Singleton, President, Courageous Conversation
    How can educators and campus leaders discuss race and its impact on males of color in order to transform their experiences? This workshop will empower participants to discuss race and racial issues using the Courageous Conversation About Race Protocol. Through a series of interactive exercises and multimedia examples, we will examine how the narratives of adult and young men of color build equity and transform the systems around them.
     
  7. Building Trust, Respect, and Critical Thinking Skills Through Engaging and Interactive Initiative Games
    Linda Solomon, Teacher: PreK-12, BTU / Boston Public Schools
    How do we use fun and interactive activities to promote trust, respect, and mutual regard among our young men that will not only be sustaining, but will teach invaluable life long skills and help them become more available to learn? Initiative Games are experiential learning tools that can be used with groups to help them work together more effectively and compassionately. They also help groups learn trust and respect for one another while modeling critical thinking skills. Essentially, Initiatives are problem-solving tasks that call upon group members to bring their physical, emotional and intellectual selves to bear on difficult tasks that have no ready-made solutions. This workshop offers participants the opportunity to actually participate in an initiative. Thus, participants will leave with an understanding of what Initiative games are, how to use them and how to effectively debrief them.
     
  8. The Culturally Relevant Classroom, A Focus on Children of African Descent
    Aminata Umoja, Executive Director, Kilombo Academic and Cultural Institute
    How do we create culturally relevant lessons that empower our students and move them towards a commitment to social justices? The session will teach participants how to create culturally relevant lessons so that children see themselves in the curriculum through an affirmation of their history and culture resulting in increased student achievement, the closing of the achievement gap and the fostering of a commitment to social justice. Participants will view classroom clips, reflect on their experiences and discuss the necessary components of a culturally relevant lesson. Educators will walk away with how to begin teaching culturally relevant lessons at their site, an example of a curriculum supplement, an example of a literature list, as well as a bibliography.
     
  9. It's not Justice: Using Restorative Practices to Nurture a Culturally Affirming, Community Building, School Climate for Young Men of Color
    Angela Ward, Administrator, Austin Independent School District (ISD)
    How do we design engaging structures, processes and tools to empower student and staff voice to address conflict from a proactive stance? A child shall lead the way when empowered to use their voice in our schools. Since January 20, 2016, Austin, Texas has been home to political turmoil and overt racist incidents. Attend this session to dialogue about how we reframed professional learning to redirect typical ways of engaging when racial conflict occurred October 2017 and January 2018 in two of our largest high schools. As you endeavor to create affirming school spaces for young men of color, learn how Austin ISD frames restorative practices as a culturally affirming, Indigenous rooted frame for professional learning and community building in our schools.
     
  10. The Great Debate: Using Evidence-Based Argumentation (EBA) and Policy Debate to Amplify Student Voice
    Kimberly Willingham, Boston Debate League (BDL)
    How do we create student-centered learning communities that cultivate and amplify student voice and whereby students collaborate with, learn from, and lead each other? Boston Debate League integrates argumentation and competitive debate into public schools to develop critical thinkers ready for college, career, and engagement with the world. BDL programs foster student voice, facilitate collaboration, and help students develop argumentation skills as they engage in cross-discipline discussions, including policy debate. Students, moving through a skill progression, produce sustained, multifaceted arguments organized around a central thesis and drawing on evidence from various sources. Participants will practice EBA activities, reflect on implications for practice, and consider how skills honed in the classroom can transfer to policy debate – a platform through which students tell their stories.

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