Wednesday: Block 1B (90 min) 3:30-5pm

COSEBOC 12th Annual Gathering of Leaders
Boys and Young Men of Color: Liberated, Empowered and Educated
Boston Park Plaza Hotel | Boston, MA |  May 29 - 31, 2018

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  1. Restructuring Alternative Ed to Meet the Needs of Boys of Color
    Rayna Briceno, Administrator, Boston Public Schools: Community Academy
    How do we redesign alternative school programs to embrace the differences of our most marginalized populations? Educators work in service of students, striving to engage all students despite their circumstance. Nevertheless, Black young men and women are continuously pushed out of their schools with no option but to seek alternative paths to education. Participants will learn foundational structures needed in alternative academic settings to foster partnership so that students can overcome challenges with schooling, community, and family-based relationships. As a result students will have the skills to apply college-, career-, and life-competencies in their journeys forward. Participates will leave this workshop with sample professional development agendas and activities to be utilized in schools and educational programs.
     
  2. Recruiting and Retaining Teachers of Color Q.U.I.C.K.! (Qualified, Quality, Unique, Intuitive, Inspiring, Collaborative, Caring, Kinesthetic and Knowledgeable
    Shareefah Mason, Teacher: PreK-12, Sarah Zumwalt Middle School
    How do we create empowering strategies to recruit and retain effective teachers of color? This interactive session will ignite a challenging conversation regarding the tremendous need for teachers of color and the difficulties districts face in meeting this overwhelming need. Participants will engage in dialogue that perpetuates the creation of a specific, universal system that can be implemented across the country to ensure the recruitment and retention of quality teachers of color. The audience will analyze data, case studies and partake in synthesis activities that will lead to the development of an empowered system that will create tremendous opportunities for unprecedented recruitment and retention of teachers of color across the country.
     
  3. Engaging Young Men of Color Through Positive STEM Experiences & Highly Individualized Support
    Alyson Mehr, Director Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
    How do we engage, empower, and retain young men of color in the STEM pipeline? CEYE's Program Model capitalizes on real-time hospital and research environments with culturally relevant opportunities to increase communication skills, reflect on experiences, and foster the development of a "scientist identity". Theoretical foundations will be characterized, signature program components and critical success factors will be discussed, and specific examples will illustrate the unique educational development needs of young men of color. Intensive Academic Counseling will also be highlighted as an intervention that encourages youth to liberate themselves from unproductive ways of thinking and behaving, empowers youth to see their perceived weaknesses as strengths, and educates youth about themselves through increased self-awareness.
     
  4. Books for Black Boys: Creating Transformative Independent Reading Experiences
    Kimberly Parker, Supervisor, Shady Hill School
    How does the creation of an inclusive classroom library--one that is grounded in mirrors, windows, and sliding glass doors--help to promote a love of reading for Black boys and support their healthy independent reading lives? Transformative literacy experiences for our Black boy readers are possible, and a classroom that is built on the foundation of independent reading is the key to creating and sustaining their reading interests. The goal of this workshop is to help educators make their classrooms places that lead to the long-term flourishing of Black boy readers, particularly ones that have had negative experiences with reading and others that seem disengaged. This interactive presentation is a combination of making the case for why independent reading matters, particularly for Black boys.
     
  5. RISK: Take it Early, Use it Often, Push Forward
    K. Chase Patterson, Administrator, Urban Academy of Greater Pittsburgh
    As 21st Century leaders in learning, how do we find comfort in taking risk and accepting failure to help shape how we disrupt, shift and manage our organizations culture and climate. Participants will discuss and define the terms “failure” and “risk” to create context for the larger session conversation around organizational disruption as well as culture and climate shift. Participants will discuss real life case studies based on the presenter's actual experiences. This session will address the Gathering’s theme by discussing the responsibilities and suggested best practices to address dropout, achievement and opportunity gaps that exist for boys and young men of color.
     
  6. The Wakonda Effect: Helping Our Boys Heal Emotionally and Flourish Academically #blackboyjoy
    Kristin Rainville, College/University Staff, Sacred Heart University
    How do we capitalize on the funds of knowledge boys of color bring to our classrooms to engage them and empower them as learners and leaders in our classrooms and schools? Our session will provide participants with specific strategies to engage boys of color as literacy learners and leaders in their classroom. Specifically, we will share: critical literacy strategies; ways to capitalize on students out of school literacies; ways to help teachers see the life and school experiences of boys of color as strengths to be built upon; expose methods to expose boys of color to texts that matter, where they can see themselves, and redefine their place in the classroom and in their community.
     
  7. MINDFULNESS: A Tool to Help Young Men of Color Succeed
    Kevin Rank, Administrator New York City Department of Education
    How can Mindfulness be used as a tool to help empower young men of color, so that they can succeed in high school, college and beyond? Chronic and toxic stress can be large contributors to what makes young men of color our most vulnerable students. We will explore the effects of stress young men of color and how educators can use mindfulness techniques to help ensure that students succeed in high school, college and beyond. Mindfulness is a universal practice that students and educators can engage in together. It has been used with our young men of color to deal with stresses that most of their peers do not face and can help to increase their success in college.
     
  8. Approaches and Insights to Mentoring Boys and Young Men of Color
    Elizabeth, Santiago, MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership
    What are strengths-based, youth-centered approaches to mentoring boys and young men of color that have shown success in closing the mentoring gap and in allowing BYMOC to live to their full potential in all aspects of life? In this session, MENTOR will share what we have learned through our partnership with My Brother's Keeper Alliance in developing the Guide to Mentoring Boys and Young Men of Color, share case studies, engage participants in activities from our Essentials training (training for mentors who mentor boys and young men of color developed in partnership with the Open Society Foundation and the Campaign for Black Male Achievement) and close with an interactive discussion on how to apply techniques in participants' programs and in communities.
     
  9. Advancing Health, Education and Community Conditions to Promote Success in Boys and Young Men of Color
    Linda Sheriff, Director, The Center for Health and Health Care in Schools
    Given the many competing priorities that schools face, how can schools partner with the community to address the root causes of mental and behavioral health problems and trauma in students? Learn about a process to build and sustain a coordinated network of school-connected partnerships to provide the positive environment and student supports necessary for all students to thrive. Through an active discussion and presentation on community context and practical frameworks, and using case examples from local, state, and national efforts, four steps will be presented that have helped stakeholders align school and community programs that support student success. Attendees will leave with information on how to deepen school-community partnerships and to access tools for supporting school-connected initiatives that support the health and learning of boys of color.
     
  10. Equity Pedagogy: Enabling Students of Color to Achieve
    Karla Vigil, EduLeaders of Color, RI/Center for Collaborative Education
    How can teachers modify techniques and methods to empower and facilitate the academic achievement of students of color? This session is grounded in James A. Banks' Theory on Multiculturalism's Five Dimensions. We will specifically focus on one dimension: Equity Pedagogy. Educators will have the opportunity to learn techniques and teaching methods that facilitate the academic achievement of students from diverse racial, ethnic, and social-class groups. Participants will engage in an activity that deepens the "how to" become aware of student's distinctive backgrounds and gain the skills to translate that knowledge into effective instruction.

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