Wednesday: Block 1A (90 min) 1:30-3pm

COSEBOC 12th Annual Gathering of Leaders
Boys and Young Men of Color: Liberated, Empowered and Educated
Boston Park Plaza Hotel | Boston, MA |  May 29 - 31, 2018

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  1. Drive to Five: Equipping Dads for Maximum Performance in 0-5 Years
    Kenneth Braswell, Executive Director, Fathers Incorporated
    Workshop highlights the Drive to Five campaign to address the importance of father engagement with their children from ages 0-5. Children whose fathers are stable and involved are better off on almost every cognitive, social, and emotional measure developed by researchers. Father involvement is related to positive cognitive, developmental, and socio-behavioral child outcomes, such as improved weight gain in preterm infants, improved breastfeeding rates, higher receptive language skills, and higher academic achievement. (Source: Garfield, C. F., & Isacco, A. (2006). Across the country students are struggling academically because the services needed to build the capacity of parents are lacking. This workshop presenter has over 27 years of working at every level of parental engagement, particularly; fatherhood. One solutions to increasing academic success is engaging fathers at the early stages of child development.
      
  2. Facing Inferiority: 3 Instructional Strategies Using Race and Economics to Liberate, Empower, and Educate Boys of Color
    Mike Brown, Principal: PreK-12, Freedom Prep
    How can we transform our "cultural incompetent" Math, ELA, and Science standards and curriculum into daily lessons of liberation and empowerment for our boys of color? So many educators fail to successfully move from "studying" cultural competence to effectively "implementing" it in class…and you will not be one of them. JOIN US for this highly engaging, thought-proving, and activities-based session called “Facing Inferiority” which places in experienced teachers’ hands 3 high leverage instructional strategies extracted from the research of some of our nation’s most prolific anti-racist theorist and educators. Participate…and watch your daily plans become lessons that lead to advanced levels of critical thinking, cultural empowerment, and student mastery.
     
  3. Creating Adult Spaces for Educational Equity that Support the Empowerment and Liberation of Boys of Color
    Christina Brown, Consultant, TNTP
    How do we create adult spaces that unpack bias and challenge inequity so that we empower and liberate boys of color by helping educators to rethink the systemic oppression built into our educational system? If schools and partner organizations are serious about empowering and liberating boys of color they will have to be serious about disrupting potential limiting educational systems. We must re-imagining schooling to create instruction, curriculum and school climates that affirm and support males of color. Educators must do critical self-work, unpack biases, shift mindsets, and learn to challenge inequity. This workshop will present an organizational journey focused on increasing diversity, equity and inclusion and share tools and resources in the service of creating schools that liberate and empower all students with a focus on the needs of males of color.
     
  4. Equity 101 
    Patrick Johnson, Director, Tacoma Public Schools
    How do we become empowered with the understanding and usage of the equity language/terms? Effectively identify and address bias? Disrupt inequities in the classroom create equity teams in your school and district and equip them to view issues through an equity lens tool? Participants in this session will be actively engaged in a variety of activities that will identify three equity issues: the understanding of equity current terms which create a common language, strategies to disrupt inequities in the workplace and community, and learning how to use an equity lens tool which is a protocol for evaluating policies, programs and practices. Participants will walk away with actual tools and strategies that can be implemented upon returning to the workplace.
     
  5. A Circle with Our Brothers: Using Restorative Practices to Connect and Heal
    Abdul-Malik Muhammad, Executive Director, Akoben
    How can we use the core principles of Restorative Practices, tailored to the culture and dynamic reality of our boys of color, to radically transform narratives and life trajectories? To turn the tide in the school-to-prison pipeline and disproportionate disciplinary practices affecting Black, Latino and First Nation boys, some educators and activists are turning to Restorative Practices. We do this by confronting maladaptive behavior, taking accountability, showing empathy for those harmed, and making things right ourselves and teaching our boys to do the same. This workshop will present the restorative approach as a dynamic and powerful process when it is especially designed with our boys of color in mind. Participants will explore how notions of culture, manhood, hope, and bias affect our Restorative Practice work with our boys.
     
  6. Standing in the Gap: Addressing the Need for Black Male Presence in Schools Through Community Engagement
    Quan Neloms, Teacher, Frederick Douglass Academy for Young Men
    In addition to increasing the number of certified Black male teachers in classrooms, what other steps can be taken immediately to bring the valuable, consistent presences of Black men into classrooms? As the only all male public school in Michigan, Frederick Douglass Academy for Young Men in Detroit is actively working to consistently involve Black men from their local community in the learning of its students. This workshop will look at two innovative and replicable programs at the school—Lyricist Society, a digital media program, and the Frederick Douglass Promise, a ninth grade interdisciplinary program—that are simultaneously engaging students and men in the school’s community.
     
  7. 5 Strategies to Securing Grants & Corporate Sponsorships for Organizations Serving Men and Boys of Color
    Patrick Patterson, President, Global Partners for Fathers and Families
    How do organizations that serve men and boys of color secure funding and sustain their work when so few funders and corporations understand the value and impact of this important work? This interactive workshop will demonstrate and provide step-by-step instructions on 5 Strategies to help organizations serving men and boys of color to secure grants and corporate funding from government and private sector funders. We will focus on how to have the first conversation with a corporation along with what should be included in a written proposal. Sample sponsorship letters and best practice tools will be shared during this session, including a focus on budgeting.
     
  8. Unpacking our Adaptive Unconscious: Becoming a Culturally Competent Urban Educator
    Velecia Saunders, Principal: PreK-12, McKinley Schools
    How does the racial adaptive unconscious inform our interactions with students and families and how can this information be used to create culturally competent learning communites for all students? Before we can work towards closing the opportunity/achievement gap for our students we must first understand what biases we bring to the table that may impact how we engage, interact and or respond to our students and families. We must also understand our students and families lived and historical experiences that also have an impact on how the school community is perceived.
     
  9. Preparing Youth How to Get and Keep a Job
    Matthew Stevens, Teacher: PreK-12, College Achieve School
    How do we (educators, parents, mentors) prepare today's youth to get and keep a job? This session will engage educators, youth service professionals, and parents in a series of case studies and role playing exercises that help to prepare youth for the workforce. Participants will be separated into the aforementioned groups and exercises are customized to help accomplish outcomes specific to the group.
     
  10. The Silent Confidence Killer: How Loss Compromises & Dismantles Our Emotional & Mental Well Being
    Mischa Toland, Consultant, Greatness Now
    What is happening or has happened beneath the surface of our Black boys who find it difficult to exercise with any degree of consistency a balance of emotional and/or mental steadiness? As human beings, we are so accustomed to experiencing loss that we underestimate what loss/trauma does to us, shifts in us, and takes from us. Underestimating these critical pieces cause us to dismiss the dire health implications while having the unrealistic expectation that we - to include our boys and young men of color - should still be the same person we were before the loss. To this end participants can expect to experience renewed perspective, knowledge of the 3 Secret Suppressants of Loss, and knowledge of the 6 Concepts of Resilience as developed by Trauma Expert, Dr. Brian Williams.

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